Newbie from KY

ALMACK

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Newb here.
I think I have picked out the powertrain and options I want.
Since I already have full size pickups, I just want a good mpg Maverick with fwd for winter driving so I am going with the 2.5 fwd base xl model with 4 options:
Locking tailgate hinge
bed extender
trailer hitch
full size spare

Does the 2.5 Hybrid engine have a good history of reliability ?
What about the cont. variable transmission ?
Are these powertrain items from other model lines ?

Thanks
 

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RonD

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Good questions

This Ford 2.5l uses Atkinson cycle instead of normal Otto cycle engines
Difference is the intake valve stays open a bit longer as piston rises on intake stroke so some of the air:fuel mix is pushed back up into the intake manifold
This makes for a more efficient burn of all remaining air:fuel on power stroke, but also reduces power by quite a bit especially at lower RPMs i.e. when starting from a stop

This is where the Hybrid part comes to the rescue, the electric motor has instant torque/power once it starts, so can more than make up for Atkinson cycles drawback when accelerating

Atkinson cycle was first designed in late 1800's but was not widely used because of the lower power, and gas/diesel was CHEAP so efficiency wasn't what people wanted.............POWER is what sold, lol

It is just a 4cyl engine with different valve timing so nothing new as far as parts, and Ford's 4cyls have been very reliable

Otto cycle gasoline engines are 25%-28% efficient, which means if a gallon of gas is $4 then $1 is used to move you down the road and $3 is used to generate excess heat
Atkinson is 36%-38% efficient

While the technology has been around a LONG TIME there is no long history for Ford's 2.5l version


Same for CVT transmission, they have been around for a long while, my first mini-bike had a CVT chain drive on crankshaft, lol, called centrifugal clutch at the time, but operated in similar way
But no long history for Ford's version, other car makers have been using them and they seem to be holding up
Mechanically they have less moving parts than current Automatics, and less moving parts is always better
 

snoranger

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The trans used in the hybrid was first used in the ‘05 Escape Hybrid... so it’s got about 16 years under its belt. Sure it’s had some updates and changes over those years, but it’s still the same base.
 
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